Pressing Tips

Pressing Tips

Here are a few pressing tips to help you get a professional finish.
Read more
A Couple Of Gathering Tips!

A Couple Of Gathering Tips!

Here are few gathering tips to help get your gathers just so!
Read more
Creating A Thread Chain

Creating A Thread Chain

A thread chain is a great option for belt or button loops. It's also a great way to create bra strap holders inside garments. One of my favourite things about thread chains is that they easily be easily added to the garment right at the end of sewing (so you don't have to worry about loops and things when you're in the middle of construction). 

Here's how to create a thread loop.

1. Cut two long pieces (approx. 70cm) of all purpose thread.

 

2. Pull both pieces of thread through a needle so it becomes 4 threads.

TIP: It's a good idea (although not essential) to run thread wax along the thread. This will help to stop the threads from knotting.

 

3. Tie a knot in the end of your threads.

4. Insert the needle where you require the thread chain to begin. You can sew another knot here for security if you would like (before you start sewing your thread chain).

5. Reinsert the needle in the same spot and pull through, but do not pull all the way. Keep that loop!

6. Hold the loop open with two fingers. Hold the thread with the needle in the other hand.

7. Pull the threads with the needle attached through the loop and pull to create a knot and another loop. (This is much more intuitive than it sounds, I promise! ). Effectively you are folding the threads with the needle attached in half to create the loop, which you then pull on.

8. Repeat this step over and over until the thread chain is long enough.

9. Finish by knotting at the end of the thread chain. Usually this means finishing the thread chain in the garment.

Read more
Using Clover Loop Pressing Bars

Using Clover Loop Pressing Bars

This week we have a quick run down on using Clover Loop Pressing Bars. Read on to find out what they are used for and how they work.
Read more
A few Tips For Sewing A Collar

A few Tips For Sewing A Collar

This week I've a few handy tips for sewing collars, including getting a really crisp sharp collar point!
Read more
Adding Ribbon To A Collar Stand

Adding Ribbon To A Collar Stand

I've finally decided to make another shirt for my husband. Whilst studying his ready to wear shirts hanging in the wardrobe I was inspired to add ribbon to the collar stand. Here's a quick 'how to'. 
Read more
An Alternative Finish (to French Seams) For Sheer Fabrics.

An Alternative Finish (to French Seams) For Sheer Fabrics.

French seams look great, but they can be a lot of work. Here is an alternative way to finish sheer, delicate fabrics if you are looking for a quicker alternative. With the right colour thread (unlike mine so you can see the stitches in the photos clearly) it's really neat and discrete. 

 

Read more
Using Bias Binding To Create A V-Neck

Using Bias Binding To Create A V-Neck

This week's Tips on Tuesday brings you an alternative way to finishing a V-neck with bias binding.
Read more
Exposed Hong Kong Seams

Exposed Hong Kong Seams

Read on for a quick how to sew an exposed Hong Kong seam. Hong Kong seams do take extra work so why not put them where they can be seen. This is a great way to add a bit of individuality to your garments. Happy sewing!
Read more
Easy Flat Felled Seams

Easy Flat Felled Seams

This week I'm covering Flat felled seams. These are great for garments that need reinforcing. I'm talking jeans, men's shirts, any seams that come under a lot of stress.

Much like French seam they do take longer to sew, but totally worth it for the right garment:)

1. Fold a 1 cm seam allowance to the wrong side on one piece of fabric and press.

2. Position the raw edge of the other piece of fabric on the pressed fold line. Fabric should be wrong sides together.

3. Stitch the garment together 7.5mm from the fold, encasing the fabric.

4. Lay the garment completely flat and press the 'seam allowance' to the side so that you can't see the raw edge.

5. Stitch through all layers 7.5mm from previous stitching line. I've used contrasting thread here, but only so it can be seen clearly in the images.

And there you have an easy flat felled seam.  

 

Read more
How to: French Seams

How to: French Seams

Read on for a quick run through on sewing French seams. A great option for sheer or lightweight fabric or if you don't own an overlocker and require a professional finish.
Read more
Reducing Stretching on Necklines, Zippers and Waistlines

Reducing Stretching on Necklines, Zippers and Waistlines

Here's a few tips for minimising the chances of stretching on garments when sewing. It's not the most exciting part of a sewing project, but it is essential for making sure there's no stretched necklines or armholes.
Read more
65 results